Child Support & Minnesota Business Owners

taxes and child support

Going Corporate With Child Support: Child support for Minnesota business owners Child support and corporate/business income are not likely to be high on anyone’s list of their favorite things to think about.  When you combine both of them together, they quickly become even less pleasant.  For Minnesota business owners, however, a recent Minnesota Supreme Court decision makes the combination of these two an important consideration in some divorce situations.  This is because, as it turns out, your income may be bigger than you think it is, at least for purposes of calculating your child support, if you are a shareholder …

Child Support & Dependency Exemptions

Taxes Can Be Fun?

Who Gets To Claim The Kids After The Divorce? It’s not uncommon for there to be some dispute about who gets to claim the children for tax purposes.  Over the years I have heard many myths about who gets to claim what for taxes, some people think it’s automatically split equally, others say that if you pay child support you get to claim the kids every year, both of these are only partially correct. First, let’s look at the IRS regulations.  The Internal Revenue Code 152(c)(3)(a) says that the custodial parent gets to claim the child unless the parent “affirmatively …

Child Support: Soviet Style

Picture of Russian child support

Parenting, Soviet-Style–in the U.S. Or, how much money do you really have for child support?   If a married couple in Minnesota gets a divorce and child support is awarded, the amount awarded largely depends on the parties’ incomes.  So, say you’re a soon-to-be ex-husband and the court is awarding child support to your ex-wife.  If you want to minimize your child support obligation, what do you do?  What can you do?  You could always move to Bora Bora and change your name, but that’s not very responsible or ethical.  Perhaps a better and more appropriate way to do this …

Can A Court Require Your Ex To Get Life Insurance After The Divorce?

Security for Minnesota spousal support awards If you have gotten divorced and been awarded spousal support (often called alimony or spousal maintenance), this is a good way of securing income to support yourself—as long as your ex is able to make the payments. What happens, however, if your ex passes away (as happy as that outcome may sound to you at times!)? The alimony payments would stop, potentially leaving you without sufficient income to live on. It’s because of this possibility that, in some circumstances, you can request the court to require that the award of spousal support be secured with a life …

Underemployed In Minnesota (For Child Support Purposes).

Underemployed for child support purposes? Imputed income in calculating Minnesota child support obligations Child support litigation may be the one time you can tell your ex that he is underperforming in terms of employment and have the legal support to back it up.  When a court makes a decision on how much child support is to be paid by a parent, the amount of child support ordered will depend on the parent’s income.  But what happens if your ex is capable of working hard but has taken an easier, less time-consuming job which pays less money?  Should your ex be rewarded …

Contempt of Court? Huh?

How you can be held in contempt of court in a Minnesota child support or other family law proceeding “Contempt of court” is one of those terms that is easy to hear over and over again on TV courtroom dramas without ever really understanding it.  But, if you’re involved in a Minnesota child support case, divorce, or similar family law proceeding, you should know what contempt of court is and how it can apply to you. So what is it? There are two different kinds of contempt:  criminal contempt and civil contempt.  Criminal contempt is a criminal offense that you …

Minnesota Child Support Order Enforcement

Having a court order for your former partner to pay child support is one thing.  Actually receiving that money from them can be a bit more challenging, however.  If your ex hasn’t kept up with his or her child support obligation, Minnesota has several different options for enforcing the order.  Which one of these will be appropriate for you will depend on how far in arrears your ex is on support and the individual facts of your situation.  The options include (but are not limited to) the following: Contempt Proceedings:  A child support agency can ask the court to find …

Does Child Support Mean Paying For Extracurricular Activities?

  This is always a difficult question to answer, because most people have two very different beliefs regarding the sufficiency of child support. The first view, usually had by the obligor (the person paying the child support) is that the amount of child support paid in Minnesota is too much and that the person receiving the child support is making money by taking care of kids and there is no possible way it costs THAT much to raise a child. The second view, most often held in Minnesota by the obligee (the person receiving the money) is that child support …

Modification of A Minnesota Child Support Order

So you got divorced and started paying child support to your ex.  But a few years later, you were laid off, making it difficult to pay the same amount as before.  What happens to that child support order now? Can you change it? Do you still have to pay the same amount of child support? In Minnesota, child support orders can be modified when a “substantial change” happens to make the terms of the order unreasonable and unfair.  That could be things like a big increase or decrease in the income of the person paying support, a big increase or …

MN Child Support 101

Minnesota Child Support 101 Do you ever feel like you missed out on some of the basics when the issue of child support first came up in your life?  Let’s take a look at the general principles you need to know about child support work in Minnesota and how they can affect you. Who’s who First, a quick vocab lesson.  In the child support world, the person paying the support is called the “obligor.”  In contrast, the “obligee” is the person to whom the support payments are owed.  A “joint child” is a child of both the parents involved in …